Easter Dinner Menu

by The Gilded Fork

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If you have family gathering ’round the table for an Easter feast, might we suggest taking full advantage of spring’s bounty? The flavors and colors arriving to market right now offer a refreshing change to our dulled winter palates. This month’s wine pairings were inspired by the book from our friends Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, What to Drink with What You Eat.

Fresh peas, lamb, beets and rhubarb…the flavors of spring. Colorful and bright, this month’s dishes are perfect for Easter dinner or any spring celebration.

APPETIZER
Mascarpone and Beet Napoleons with Walnut Oil
Suggested pairing: New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc
(See pairing notes below)

SOUP
Spring Pea Soup
Suggested pairing: New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

MAIN COURSE
Roman Roast Leg of Lamb with Orzo
Suggested pairing: California Zinfandel or Cabernet

DESSERT
Anise Panna Cotta with Spiced Rhubarb
Suggested pairing: Moscato d’Asti or Late-Harvest Riesling

PAIRING NOTES

This month our pairings were inspired by the new book from Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, What to Drink with What You Eat (click to buy it — we highly recommend it!). This must-have addition to your food library makes it simple to pair wines with your meals, and makes it all quite simple and easy to understand. You can listen to our interview with Andrew and Karen on Food Philosophy #34, where they talk about the inspiration for this tome that is taking the food world by storm.

Mascarpone and Beet Napoleons with Walnut Oil &
Spring Pea Soup

Varietal: New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

Reasoning: Sauvignon Blanc is best paired with acidic foods, and a light-to-medium bodied New World wine like this is a nice balance for the acidity and sweetness of the beets. The citrusy nose will also nicely complement the lightness of the pea soup.

Roman Roast Leg of Lamb with Orzo

Varietal: California Cabernet or Zinfandel

Reasoning: Both of these California reds are a great match for the roasted lamb and garlic flavors. If you prefer bold, big, full-bodied reds, go with the Cabernet. If you want a more fruity, jammy pairing stick with the Zinfandel.

Anise Panna Cotta with Spiced Rhubarb

Varietal: Moscato d’Asti or Late-Harvest Riesling

Reasoning: The sweetness and bubbles of the Moscato d’Asti will complement the richness of the cream while offering a contrast to the tang of the spiced rhubarb. You can also pair this dessert with any sweet wine based on the Muscat grape. If Muscat wines are a bit too sweet for you, try a late-harvest Riesling instead.

MISE EN PLACE

For those curious about the meaning of mise en place, it is a French culinary term for “set in place.” If you have ever watched a cooking show, or been inside a restaurant kitchen, you will notice that next to the cooking area, things are set up just so. Ingredients, sauces and critical elements are ready to be used, whether pre-cooked, pre-chopped, or ready as a garnish. This kind of organized setup enables a cook to focus on the actual act of cooking itself without distraction. Our intention with this section is to use the same approach at home, enabling you to host your own special occasions with flair.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Nomadic Samuel October 13, 2012 at 9:01 pm

This looks like a delicious spring menu 🙂 Nothing says spring to me quite as much as rhubarb.

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